Between the Lines

Between the Lines

40 years of books without bosses, 1977-2017

Events

  • Kevin MacKay speaking on “Radical Transformation” in Ottawa

    25OneCommunity, 251 Bank St. 2nd floor, Ottawa, ON

    Join author, professor and activist Kevin MacKay for a presentation on Radical Transformation: Oligarchy, Collapse, and the Crisis of Civilization. Radical Transformation is a story about industrial civilization’s impending collapse, and about the possibilities of averting this fate. Human communities first emerged as egalitarian, democratic groups that existed in symbiotic relationship with their environments. Increasing complexity led to the emergence of oligarchy, in which societies became captive to the logic of domination, exploitation, and ecological destruction. The challenge facing us today is to build a movement that will radically transform civilization and once more align our evolutionary trajectory in the direction of democracy, equality, and ecological sustainability.

    “Kevin MacKay has written a wonderfully lucid yet thoroughly uncompromising account of our world’s crisis. Drawing on a vast knowledge of history, human evolution, philosophy, and modern complexity theory, he tells a story that recognizes the marvels of human civilization while revealing its dark tendency towards oligarchic structures of power and exploitation. He then shows us how we can respond to preserve the best while defeating the worst. Radical Transformation is a tour de force.”– Thomas Homer-Dixon, author of The Upside of Down: Catastrophe, Creativity and the Renewal of Civilization

  • Law’s responsibility for corporate irresponsibility (lessons from “Class Privilege”)

    Saint Mary's University 903 Robie St, Room 255, Sobey Building, , Halifax, NS

    Join legal expert Harry Glasbeek for a presentation on law’s sponsorship of corporate irresponsibility.

    Capitalism’s agenda is the endless pursuit of private accumulation of socially produced wealth. In our system, the corporation—created by law—is meant to hide this agenda, to distract us so that flesh and blood capitalists can do what they like. But when the workings of the corporation are examined, they reveal a betrayal of the very values and norms that, for their legitimacy’s sake, capitalists in our parts of the world purport to share.

    Harry Glasbeek is Professor Emeritus and Senior Scholar at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University. He has also taught at the universities of Melbourne and Monash in Australia, and the University of Western Ontario. He is the author of ten books including Wealth by Stealth: Corporate Crime, Corporate Law, and the Perversion of Democracy.

  • Serial Girls and the Question of Race (English)

    Program Room, Brandon Public Library Unit 1, 710 Rosser Ave, Brandon, MB

    This talk will broach the question of race in relation to the image of serial girls in literature and visual art. A specific focus will be placed on how seriality affects women of color: How does this concept operate both formally and symbolically, imposing an ideal (white) female body and an ideal image of femininity? The aim of this talk is to showcase the way seriality is also used by artists of color as a means for resistance against white cultural supremacy and (white) misogyny. In this context, the image of serial girls appears as a symptom of racism and as the possibility of anti-racist engagement.

    Presented by BU’s Faculty of Arts Speaker Series, the Department of Classical and Modern Languages, as well as the Gender & Women’s Studies Program.

    Delvaux is a Professor of literature and women’s studies at Université du Québec à Montréal. She has published extensively on a wide array of topics, including contemporary literature, testimonial literature, popular culture, history and philosophy, and is the author of four novels. Her speaking engagements in Manitoba are sponsored by the Margaret Laurence Endowment Fund, administered by the Gender & Women’s Studies program at BU.

  • An Evening with Martine Delvaux (in conversation with Dr. Eftihia Mihelakis)

    McNally Robinson Bookstore, 1120 Grant Ave, Winnipeg, MB

    Come hear Martine Delvaux”, author of Serial Girls: From Barbie to Pussy Riot, in conversation with Dr. Eftihia Mihelakis. This event is free and open to the public.

    Everywhere you look patriarchal society reduces women to a series of repeating symbols: serial girls.

    On TV and in film, on the internet and in magazines, pop culture and ancient architecture, serial girls are all around us, moving in perfect sync—as dolls, as dancers, as statues. From Tiller Girls to Barbie dolls, Playboy bunnies to Pussy Riot, Martine Delvaux produces a provocative analysis of the many gendered assumptions that underlie modern culture. Delvaux draws on the works of Barthes, Foucault, de Beauvoir, Woolf, and more to argue that serial girls are not just the ubiquitous symbols of patriarchal domination but also offer the possibility of liberation.

    Co-presented by the Faculty of Arts Speaker Series, the Gender & Women’s Studies Program and the Department of Classical & Modern Languagues (French) Department at Brandon University.

    Martine Delvaux is a professor of literature at the Université du Québec à Montréal, specializing in feminist theory, and is the author of four novels, including The Last Bullet is for You.

  • Law’s sponsorship of corporate irresponsibility with Harry Glasbeek

    Ryerson University, Institute for Corporate Responsibility, Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas St W , Toronto, ON

    Join legal expert Harry Glasbeek for a presentation on law’s sponsorship of corporate irresponsibility.

    Capitalism’s agenda is the endless pursuit of private accumulation of socially produced wealth. In our system, the corporation—created by law—is meant to hide this agenda, to distract us so that flesh and blood capitalists can do what they like. But when the workings of the corporation are examined, they reveal a betrayal of the very values and norms that, for their legitimacy’s sake, capitalists in our parts of the world purport to share.

  • Des filles en série au boys’ club, ou quand les hommes sont entre eux

    Clark Hall, Room 104, Brandon University, Brandon, MB

    Le boys’ club est tout et partout. Il est ce qu’on nomme le patriarcat, ou ce que je préfère nommer la domination masculine ; dans tous les cas, il est un système où les hommes sont hiérarchiquement supérieurs aux femmes, où ils sont sujets et elles objets, et où ils se les échangent. Mon intuition est que cette structure ne correspond à rien si on ne prend pas en compte les hommes entre eux. Non pas la masculinité en tant que telle, ou l’homme comme individu ; moins le « boys » que l’idée même du « club ». Si la figure des filles en série se déployait de telle sorte que les filles se libéraient d’un carcan, devenaient actives et transgressaient la loi de leur immobilité, je veux voir le boys’ club comme une figure à la fois immobile dans son immanence et toujours déjà en mouvement par le réseau qui la sous-tend. La masculinité est invisible, mais un de ses visages est celui du regroupement. Ainsi, je veux voir le boys’ club comme ce système qui 1) favorise les rapports des hommes entre eux, et en regard du pouvoir ; 2) s’organise autour d’une femme, une seule, qui les représente toutes.

  • Harry Glasbeek on Class Privilege How Law Shelters Shareholders and Coddles Capitalism (Ottawa)

    Octopus Books, 116 Third Avenue, Ottawa, ON

    “Every progressive should read this book.” – Linda McQuaig

    Capitalism’s agenda is the endless pursuit of private accumulation of socially produced wealth. In our system, the corporation—created by law—is meant to hide this agenda, to distract us so that flesh and blood capitalists can do what they like. But when the workings of the corporation are examined, they reveal a betrayal of the very values and norms that, for their legitimacy’s sake, capitalists in our parts of the world purport to share.

    Harry Glasbeek highlights one of capitalism’s weak spots–the perverting economic, political, and ethical roles played by the prime instrument of private wealth accumulation: the legal corporation. Once the corporate mask is ripped off, those who hide behind it become visible. Stripped of their protective garb, the capitalist class will be just as naked as the rest of us are when we face their corporations.

    Harry Glasbeek is Professor Emeritus and Senior Scholar at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University. He has also taught at the universities of Melbourne and Monash in Australia, and the University of Western Ontario. He is the author of ten books including Wealth by Stealth: Corporate Crime, Corporate Law, and the Perversion of Democracy.

  • Harry Glasbeek on Law’s responsibility for corporate irresponsibility (U of Ottawa)

    University of Ottawa FTX 359, Ottawa, ON

    There is much public criticism of recurrent failures to hold major corporations, their owners and senior executives to account for the many wrongfully inflicted harms their conduct inflicts. It offends both our political and legal value systems. Outside the corporate sphere, law is intent on holding those who benefit from activities they control responsible for the outcomes of those activities for example, liquor licensees’ liability for their patrons’ wrongdoing; churches for their misbehaving clergy. How has it come about that a different set of rules apply in the corporate sphere? A non-technical exposition as to the way in which law has constituted our most important economic vehicle, the for-profit corporation, to make it (i), difficult for us to use our normal rules and (ii), invite those in control of corporations to act heedlessly toward others, will be offered. This cannot be justified, neither conceptually, nor morally. Frequently a counter-argument is used to justify this different legal treatment of corporate actors. It is that, in the end, corporate exceptionalism benefits us all. That argument is an empirical one. Evidence will be offered to show that the extent and quality of welfare created by allowing entrepreneurs to use the corporation are vastly exaggerated and that the harms done by the use of this vehicle are seriously underestimated. A recommendation as to what can be done to bring the treatment of corporate actors into line with the way in which all other citizens are expected to behave will be proffered. Essentially it calls for controlling shareholders to abide by the Canadian values and norms they are often heard to urge the rest of us to respect and honour.

    Harry Glasbeek, B.A., LL.B. (Hons.) University of Melbourne, JD (Chicago), Professor Emeritus and Senior Scholar, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University, has taught at the universities of Melbourne and Monash in Australia, and the University of Western Ontario in Canada. From 1974 to 1996 he was a Professor at Osgoode Hall Law School. After retirement, until 2013, he spent 6 months of the year as a visitor and Adjunct Professor at Victoria University. He has written books on Australian labour law and Australian evidence law, on Canadian labour law and Canadian evidence law, as well as more than 130 articles on tort law, labour law, Bills of Rights, legal education, corporate law, corporate criminality, corporate social responsibility and occupational health and safety. His last book, the eleventh, is Class Privilege: how law shelters shareholders and coddles capitalism, Toronto: Between the Lines, 2017. His forthcoming book is Capitalism: A Crime Story (2018, Between the Lines).

  • Harry Glasbeek on Law’s responsibility for corporate irresponsibility (Carleton)

    Carleton University, room TBA, Ottawa, ON

    There is much public criticism of recurrent failures to hold major corporations, their owners and senior executives to account for the many wrongfully inflicted harms their conduct inflicts. It offends both our political and legal value systems. Outside the corporate sphere, law is intent on holding those who benefit from activities they control responsible for the outcomes of those activities for example, liquor licensees’ liability for their patrons’ wrongdoing; churches for their misbehaving clergy. How has it come about that a different set of rules apply in the corporate sphere? A non-technical exposition as to the way in which law has constituted our most important economic vehicle, the for-profit corporation, to make it (i), difficult for us to use our normal rules and (ii), invite those in control of corporations to act heedlessly toward others, will be offered. This cannot be justified, neither conceptually, nor morally. Frequently a counter-argument is used to justify this different legal treatment of corporate actors. It is that, in the end, corporate exceptionalism benefits us all. That argument is an empirical one.

    Evidence will be offered to show that the extent and quality of welfare created by allowing entrepreneurs to use the corporation are vastly exaggerated and that the harms done by the use of this vehicle are seriously underestimated. A recommendation as to what can be done to bring the treatment of corporate actors into line with the way in which all other citizens are expected to behave will be proffered. Essentially it calls for controlling shareholders to abide by the Canadian values and norms they are often heard to urge the rest of us to respect and honour.

    Harry Glasbeek, B.A., LL.B. (Hons.) University of Melbourne, JD (Chicago), Professor Emeritus and Senior Scholar, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University, has taught at the universities of Melbourne and Monash in Australia, and the University of Western Ontario in Canada. From 1974 to 1996 he was a Professor at Osgoode Hall Law School. After retirement, until 2013, he spent 6 months of the year as a visitor and Adjunct Professor at Victoria University. He has written books on Australian labour law and Australian evidence law, on Canadian labour law and Canadian evidence law, as well as more than 130 articles on tort law, labour law, Bills of Rights, legal education, corporate law, corporate criminality, corporate social responsibility and occupational health and safety. His last book, the eleventh, is Class Privilege: how law shelters shareholders and coddles capitalism, Toronto: Between the Lines, 2017. His forthcoming book is Capitalism: A Crime Story (2018, Between the Lines).

  • Book lauch “Freethinker: The Life and Works of Éva Circé-Côté”

    L'Euguélionne librairie féministe 1426 Rue Beaudry, Montreal, QC

    Join Andrée Lévesque for an (English) presentation on her book Freethinker: The Life and Works of Éva Circé-Côté.

    Poet, playwright, and librarian, Éva Circé-Côté was a prolific journalist writing for progressive newspapers under a number of pseudonyms. As a feminist and a freethinker who fought for equality and secularism, she offers a non-conformist perspective on Quebec society and politics in the first four decades of the twentieth century.

    Freethinker is translated from the 2011 Clio prize winner,_ Éva Circé-Côté, libre penseuse, 1871–1949_.

    This beautifully written and argued book sheds new light on Montreal’s cultural “avant-garde.” Her perspectives on everything from war through nationalism will overturn many readers’ understandings of Quebec ideas and society over the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It is a stunning contribution to the history of Canadian and Quebec women.– Bettina Bradbury, professor emerita, History and Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, York University

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