Between the Lines

Between the Lines

Challenging the mainstream since 1977

Events

  • Jamie Swift on The Vimy Trap (Ottawa)

    Royal Oak, the Canal branch, 221 Echo Drive, Ottawa, ON

    The story of the bloody 1917 Battle of Vimy Ridge is, according to many of today’s tellings, a heroic founding moment for Canada. This noble, birth-of-a-nation narrative is regularly applied to the Great War in general. Yet this mythical tale is rather new. “Vimyism”—today’s official story of glorious, martial patriotism—contrasts sharply with the complex ways in which veterans, artists, clerics, and even politicians who had supported the war interpreted its meaning over the decades.

    Was the Great War a futile imperial debacle? A proud, nation-building milestone? Contending Great War memories have helped to shape how later wars were imagined. The Vimy Trap provides a probe of commemoration cultures. This work of public history—combining scholarly insight with sharp-eyed journalism, and based on primary sources and school textbooks, battlefield visits and war art—explains both how and why peace and war remain contested terrain in ever-changing landscapes of Canadian memory.

    Kingston writer Jamie Swift is the author of numerous books and lectures at the Smith School of Business at Queen’s University. He is the co-author (with Ian McKay) of Warrior Nation: Rebranding Canada in the Age of Anxiety.

    Co-sponsored by L’Institut Rideau Institute, Group of 78, Citizens for Public Justice, The Vimy Ridge Anti-War Project, Ottawa.

  • Jamie Swift presenting on The Vimy Trap, Saskatoon

    McNally Robinson Booksellers Saskatoon, 3130-8th Street East, Saskatoon, SK

    The story of the bloody 1917 Battle of Vimy Ridge is, according to many of today’s tellings, a heroic founding moment for Canada. This noble, birth-of-a-nation narrative is regularly applied to the Great War in general. Yet this mythical tale is rather new. “Vimyism”—today’s official story of glorious, martial patriotism—contrasts sharply with the complex ways in which veterans, artists, clerics, and even politicians who had supported the war interpreted its meaning over the decades.

    Was the Great War a futile imperial debacle? A proud, nation-building milestone? Contending Great War memories have helped to shape how later wars were imagined. The Vimy Trap provides a probe of commemoration cultures. This work of public history—combining scholarly insight with sharp-eyed journalism, and based on primary sources and school textbooks, battlefield visits and war art—explains both how and why peace and war remain contested terrain in ever-changing landscapes of Canadian memory.

    Kingston writer Jamie Swift is the author of numerous books and lectures at the Smith School of Business at Queen’s University. He is the co-author (with Ian McKay) of Warrior Nation: Rebranding Canada in the Age of Anxiety.

    We acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, which last year invested $153 million to bring the arts to Canadians throughout the country. Nous remercions le Conseil des arts du Canada de son soutien. L’an dernier, le Conseil a investi 153 millions de dollars pour mettre de l’art dans la vie des Canadiennes et des Canadiens de tout le pays.

  • Jamie Swift, speaking and signing, Winnipeg

    McNally Robinson, Winnipeg, Grant Park Shopping Centre, 1120 Grant Ave, Winnipeg, MB

    The story of the bloody 1917 Battle of Vimy Ridge is, according to many of today’s tellings, a heroic founding moment for Canada. This noble, birth-of-a-nation narrative is regularly applied to the Great War in general. Yet this mythical tale is rather new. “Vimyism”—today’s official story of glorious, martial patriotism—contrasts sharply with the complex ways in which veterans, artists, clerics, and even politicians who had supported the war interpreted its meaning over the decades.

    Was the Great War a futile imperial debacle? A proud, nation-building milestone? Contending Great War memories have helped to shape how later wars were imagined. The Vimy Trap provides a probe of commemoration cultures. This work of public history—combining scholarly insight with sharp-eyed journalism, and based on primary sources and school textbooks, battlefield visits and war art—explains both how and why peace and war remain contested terrain in ever-changing landscapes of Canadian memory.

    Kingston writer Jamie Swift is the author of numerous books and lectures at the Smith School of Business at Queen’s University. He is the co-author (with Ian McKay) of Warrior Nation: Rebranding Canada in the Age of Anxiety.

    We acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, which last year invested $153 million to bring the arts to Canadians throughout the country. Nous remercions le Conseil des arts du Canada de son soutien. L’an dernier, le Conseil a investi 153 millions de dollars pour mettre de l’art dans la vie des Canadiennes et des Canadiens de tout le pays.

  • Jamie Swift on The Vimy Trap, Regina

    Knox-Metropolitan United Church, 2340 Victoria Ave, Regina, SK

    The story of the bloody 1917 Battle of Vimy Ridge is, according to many of today’s tellings, a heroic founding moment for Canada. This noble, birth-of-a-nation narrative is regularly applied to the Great War in general. Yet this mythical tale is rather new. “Vimyism”—today’s official story of glorious, martial patriotism—contrasts sharply with the complex ways in which veterans, artists, clerics, and even politicians who had supported the war interpreted its meaning over the decades.

    Was the Great War a futile imperial debacle? A proud, nation-building milestone? Contending Great War memories have helped to shape how later wars were imagined. The Vimy Trap provides a probe of commemoration cultures. This work of public history—combining scholarly insight with sharp-eyed journalism, and based on primary sources and school textbooks, battlefield visits and war art—explains both how and why peace and war remain contested terrain in ever-changing landscapes of Canadian memory.

    Kingston writer Jamie Swift is the author of numerous books and lectures at the Smith School of Business at Queen’s University. He is the co-author (with Ian McKay) of Warrior Nation: Rebranding Canada in the Age of Anxiety.

    We acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, which last year invested $153 million to bring the arts to Canadians throughout the country. Nous remercions le Conseil des arts du Canada de son soutien. L’an dernier, le Conseil a investi 153 millions de dollars pour mettre de l’art dans la vie des Canadiennes et des Canadiens de tout le pays.

  • Jamie Swift on The Vimy Trap, Cupar SK

    Cupar Library 217 Stanley St, Cupar, SK

    The story of the bloody 1917 Battle of Vimy Ridge is, according to many of today’s tellings, a heroic founding moment for Canada. This noble, birth-of-a-nation narrative is regularly applied to the Great War in general. Yet this mythical tale is rather new. “Vimyism”—today’s official story of glorious, martial patriotism—contrasts sharply with the complex ways in which veterans, artists, clerics, and even politicians who had supported the war interpreted its meaning over the decades.

    Was the Great War a futile imperial debacle? A proud, nation-building milestone? Contending Great War memories have helped to shape how later wars were imagined. The Vimy Trap provides a probe of commemoration cultures. This work of public history—combining scholarly insight with sharp-eyed journalism, and based on primary sources and school textbooks, battlefield visits and war art—explains both how and why peace and war remain contested terrain in ever-changing landscapes of Canadian memory.

    Kingston writer Jamie Swift is the author of numerous books and lectures at the Smith School of Business at Queen’s University. He is the co-author (with Ian McKay) of_ Warrior Nation: Rebranding Canada in the Age of Anxiety._

    We acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, which last year invested $153 million to bring the arts to Canadians throughout the country. Nous remercions le Conseil des arts du Canada de son soutien. L’an dernier, le Conseil a investi 153 millions de dollars pour mettre de l’art dans la vie des Canadiennes et des Canadiens de tout le pays.

  • More than a book launch - Maththatmatters2

    Supermarket Restaurant and Bar, 268 Augusta Ave,, Toronto, ON

    Do a simple, fun math activity (All math abilities welcome) Pick up the book Have fun and celebrate the next fifty lessons!

    In his follow-up to the groundbreaking Maththatmatters, David Stocker gives us Maththatmatters2 a collection of 50 brilliant lessons for grades 6-9 that link mathematics and social justice. For educators keen to provide rich leaning opportunities and differentiated content that engages students with their lived realities, these lessons are sure to spark meaningful discussions…and action.

    Join author David Stocker and special guest Erika Shaker, Editor, and Director of Education and Outreach Canadian Centre for Policity Alternatives for this free event!

  • Ian McKay on The Vimy Trap, Toronto

    Steelworkers Hall, 25 Cecil Street, Toronto, ON

    Part of the Toronto Worker’s History Project, join co-author Ian McKay for a talk on The Vimy Trap.

    The story of the bloody 1917 Battle of Vimy Ridge is, according to many of today’s tellings, a heroic founding moment for Canada. This noble, birth-of-a-nation narrative is regularly applied to the Great War in general. Yet this mythical tale is rather new. “Vimyism”—today’s official story of glorious, martial patriotism—contrasts sharply with the complex ways in which veterans, artists, clerics, and even politicians who had supported the war interpreted its meaning over the decades.

    Was the Great War a futile imperial debacle? A proud, nation-building milestone? Contending Great War memories have helped to shape how later wars were imagined. The Vimy Trap provides a probe of commemoration cultures. This work of public history—combining scholarly insight with sharp-eyed journalism, and based on primary sources and school textbooks, battlefield visits and war art—explains both how and why peace and war remain contested terrain in ever-changing landscapes of Canadian memory.

    Ian McKay is the L.R. Wilson Chair in Canadian History at McMaster University and the author of the award-winning_ Reasoning Otherwise: Leftists and the People’s Enlightenment in Canada, 1890–1920_ and the co-author of Warrior Nation: Rebranding Canada in the Age of Anxiety.

  • Jamie Swift talks The Vimy Trap at Toronto Reference Library

    Toronto Reference Library Beeton Hall, 789 Yonge St, Toronto, Toronto, ON

    “Do you have Vimyism?” Come out and hear Jamie Swift present on The Vimy Trap

    The story of the bloody 1917 Battle of Vimy Ridge is, according to many of today’s tellings, a heroic founding moment for Canada. This noble, birth-of-a-nation narrative is regularly applied to the Great War in general. Yet this mythical tale is rather new. “Vimyism” - today’s official story of glorious, martial patriotism - contrasts sharply with the complex ways in which veterans, artists, clerics, and even politicians who had supported the war interpreted its meaning over the decades.

    Was the Great War a futile imperial debacle? A proud, nation-building milestone? Contending Great War memories have helped to shape how later wars were imagined. The Vimy Trap provides a powerful probe of commemoration cultures. This subtle, fast-paced work of public history - combining scholarly insight with sharp-eyed journalism, and based on primary sources and school textbooks, battlefield visits and war art - explains both how and why peace and war remain contested terrain in ever-changing landscapes of Canadian memory.

    Kingston writer Jamie Swift is the author of numerous books. He works on social justice issues for the Sisters of Providence of St. Vincent de Paul and lectures at the Smith School of Business at Queen’s University.

  • Toronto’s Poor talk by Bryan Palmer and Gaétan Héroux at Ryerson U

    380 Victoria Street, Ryerson University POD 250 (second floor), Toronto, ON

    Ryerson Faculty of Arts’ Department of History, Department of Politics and Public Administration and Community Engaged Learning and Teaching (CELT) invite you to a talk on Toronto’s Poor. A Rebellious History.

    Trent Professor Bryan Palmer, local historian of the working-class, and anti-poverty activist Gaétan Héroux will present their new book.

    Toronto’s Poor reveals the long and too often forgotten history of poor people’s resistance. It details how the homeless, the unemployed, and the destitute have struggled to survive and secure food and shelter in the wake of the many panics, downturns, recessions, and depressions that punctuate the years from the 1830s to the present.

    Opening remarks and welcome: Kike Roach, Sam Gindin Chair in Social Justice and Democracy, moderator: Cathy Crowe, Distinguished Visiting Practitioner.

    Light refreshments will be provided.

    Copies of Toronto’s Poor will be available for purchase and signing by the authors.

  • Ester Reiter speaking on A Future Without Hate or Need in Montreal

    University of Concordia 4040 St-Laurent #R01, Montreal, QC

    The Concordia University Institute for Canadian Jewish Studies and The Museum of Jewish Montreal present a celebration of the A Future Without Hate or Need: The Promise of the Jewish Left in Canada

    Driven from their homes in Russia, Poland, and Romania by pogroms and poverty, many Jews who came to Canada in the wave of immigration after the 1905 Russian revolution were committed radicals. A Future Without Hate or Need brings to life the rich and multi-layered lives of a dissident political community, their shared experiences and community-building cultural projects, as they attempted to weave together their ethnic particularity—their identity as Jews—with their internationalist class politics.

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