Between the Lines

Between the Lines

Challenging the mainstream since 1977

Events

  • Tim McCaskell (Reading and Signing) in Saskatoon

    McNally Robinson Saskatoon, 3130-8th Street East, Saskatoon, SK

    How did a social movement evolve from a small group of young radicals to the incorporation of LGBTQ communities into full citizenship on the model of Canadian multiculturalism? Tim McCaskell contextualizes his work in gay, queer, and AIDS activism in Toronto from 1974 to 2014 within the shift from the Keynesian welfare state of the 1970s to the neoliberal economy of the new millennium. A shift that saw sexuality — once tightly regulated by conservative institutions — become an economic driver of late capitalism, and sexual minorities celebrated as a niche market. But even as it promoted legal equality, this shift increased disparity and social inequality.

    Today, the glue of sexual identity strains to hold together a community ever more fractured along lines of class, race, ethnicity, and gender; the celebration of LGBTQ inclusion pinkwashes injustice at home and abroad. Queer Progress tries to make sense of this transformation by narrating the complexities and contradictions of forty years of queer politics in Canada’s largest city.

  • Jamie Swift on The Vimy Trap (Ottawa)

    University of Ottawa (room TBA), Ottawa, ON

    The story of the bloody 1917 Battle of Vimy Ridge is, according to many of today’s tellings, a heroic founding moment for Canada. This noble, birth-of-a-nation narrative is regularly applied to the Great War in general. Yet this mythical tale is rather new. “Vimyism”—today’s official story of glorious, martial patriotism—contrasts sharply with the complex ways in which veterans, artists, clerics, and even politicians who had supported the war interpreted its meaning over the decades.

    Was the Great War a futile imperial debacle? A proud, nation-building milestone? Contending Great War memories have helped to shape how later wars were imagined. The Vimy Trap provides a probe of commemoration cultures. This work of public history—combining scholarly insight with sharp-eyed journalism, and based on primary sources and school textbooks, battlefield visits and war art—explains both how and why peace and war remain contested terrain in ever-changing landscapes of Canadian memory.

    Kingston writer Jamie Swift is the author of numerous books and lectures at the Smith School of Business at Queen’s University. He is the co-author (with Ian McKay) of Warrior Nation: Rebranding Canada in the Age of Anxiety.

    Co-sponsored by L’Institut Rideau Institute, Group of 78, Citizens for Public Justice, The Vimy Ridge Anti-War Project, Ottawa.

  • Tim McCaskell—Speaking & Signing (Winnipeg)

    McNally Robinson Winnipeg, , Attached to Grant Park Mall. 1120 Grant Avenue, MB

    How did a social movement evolve from a small group of young radicals to the incorporation of LGBTQ communities into full citizenship on the model of Canadian multiculturalism?

    Tim McCaskell contextualizes his work in gay, queer, and AIDS activism in Toronto from 1974 to 2014 within the shift from the Keynesian welfare state of the 1970s to the neoliberal economy of the new millennium. A shift that saw sexuality —once tightly regulated by conservative institutions—become an economic driver of late capitalism, and sexual minorities celebrated as a niche market. But even as it promoted legal equality, this shift increased disparity and social inequality. Today, the glue of sexual identity strains to hold together a community ever more fractured along lines of class, race, ethnicity, and gender; the celebration of LGBTQ inclusion pinkwashes injustice at home and abroad.

    Queer Progress tries to make sense of this transformation by narrating the complexities and contradictions of forty years of queer politics in Canada’s largest city.

    From 1974 to 1986 Tim McCaskell was a member of the collective that ran The Body Politic, Canada’s iconic gay liberation journal. He was a founding member of AIDS ACTION NOW!, and a spokesperson for Queers Against Israeli Apartheid. He is the author of R_ace to Equity: Disrupting Educational Inequality._

  • Jamie Swift presenting on The Vimy Trap, Saskatoon

    McNally Robinson Booksellers Saskatoon, 3130-8th Street East, Saskatoon, SK

    The story of the bloody 1917 Battle of Vimy Ridge is, according to many of today’s tellings, a heroic founding moment for Canada. This noble, birth-of-a-nation narrative is regularly applied to the Great War in general. Yet this mythical tale is rather new. “Vimyism”—today’s official story of glorious, martial patriotism—contrasts sharply with the complex ways in which veterans, artists, clerics, and even politicians who had supported the war interpreted its meaning over the decades.

    Was the Great War a futile imperial debacle? A proud, nation-building milestone? Contending Great War memories have helped to shape how later wars were imagined. The Vimy Trap provides a probe of commemoration cultures. This work of public history—combining scholarly insight with sharp-eyed journalism, and based on primary sources and school textbooks, battlefield visits and war art—explains both how and why peace and war remain contested terrain in ever-changing landscapes of Canadian memory.

    Kingston writer Jamie Swift is the author of numerous books and lectures at the Smith School of Business at Queen’s University. He is the co-author (with Ian McKay) of Warrior Nation: Rebranding Canada in the Age of Anxiety.

    We acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, which last year invested $153 million to bring the arts to Canadians throughout the country. Nous remercions le Conseil des arts du Canada de son soutien. L’an dernier, le Conseil a investi 153 millions de dollars pour mettre de l’art dans la vie des Canadiennes et des Canadiens de tout le pays.

  • Jamie Swift, speaking and signing, Winnipeg

    McNally Robinson, Winnipeg, Grant Park Shopping Centre, 1120 Grant Ave, Winnipeg, MB

    The story of the bloody 1917 Battle of Vimy Ridge is, according to many of today’s tellings, a heroic founding moment for Canada. This noble, birth-of-a-nation narrative is regularly applied to the Great War in general. Yet this mythical tale is rather new. “Vimyism”—today’s official story of glorious, martial patriotism—contrasts sharply with the complex ways in which veterans, artists, clerics, and even politicians who had supported the war interpreted its meaning over the decades.

    Was the Great War a futile imperial debacle? A proud, nation-building milestone? Contending Great War memories have helped to shape how later wars were imagined. The Vimy Trap provides a probe of commemoration cultures. This work of public history—combining scholarly insight with sharp-eyed journalism, and based on primary sources and school textbooks, battlefield visits and war art—explains both how and why peace and war remain contested terrain in ever-changing landscapes of Canadian memory.

    Kingston writer Jamie Swift is the author of numerous books and lectures at the Smith School of Business at Queen’s University. He is the co-author (with Ian McKay) of Warrior Nation: Rebranding Canada in the Age of Anxiety.

    We acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, which last year invested $153 million to bring the arts to Canadians throughout the country. Nous remercions le Conseil des arts du Canada de son soutien. L’an dernier, le Conseil a investi 153 millions de dollars pour mettre de l’art dans la vie des Canadiennes et des Canadiens de tout le pays.

  • Jamie Swift on The Vimy Trap, Regina

    Knox-Metropolitan United Church, 2340 Victoria Ave, Regina, SK

    The story of the bloody 1917 Battle of Vimy Ridge is, according to many of today’s tellings, a heroic founding moment for Canada. This noble, birth-of-a-nation narrative is regularly applied to the Great War in general. Yet this mythical tale is rather new. “Vimyism”—today’s official story of glorious, martial patriotism—contrasts sharply with the complex ways in which veterans, artists, clerics, and even politicians who had supported the war interpreted its meaning over the decades.

    Was the Great War a futile imperial debacle? A proud, nation-building milestone? Contending Great War memories have helped to shape how later wars were imagined. The Vimy Trap provides a probe of commemoration cultures. This work of public history—combining scholarly insight with sharp-eyed journalism, and based on primary sources and school textbooks, battlefield visits and war art—explains both how and why peace and war remain contested terrain in ever-changing landscapes of Canadian memory.

    Kingston writer Jamie Swift is the author of numerous books and lectures at the Smith School of Business at Queen’s University. He is the co-author (with Ian McKay) of Warrior Nation: Rebranding Canada in the Age of Anxiety.

    We acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, which last year invested $153 million to bring the arts to Canadians throughout the country. Nous remercions le Conseil des arts du Canada de son soutien. L’an dernier, le Conseil a investi 153 millions de dollars pour mettre de l’art dans la vie des Canadiennes et des Canadiens de tout le pays.

  • Jamie Swift on The Vimy Trap, Cupar SK

    Cupar Library 217 Stanley St, Cupar, SK

    The story of the bloody 1917 Battle of Vimy Ridge is, according to many of today’s tellings, a heroic founding moment for Canada. This noble, birth-of-a-nation narrative is regularly applied to the Great War in general. Yet this mythical tale is rather new. “Vimyism”—today’s official story of glorious, martial patriotism—contrasts sharply with the complex ways in which veterans, artists, clerics, and even politicians who had supported the war interpreted its meaning over the decades.

    Was the Great War a futile imperial debacle? A proud, nation-building milestone? Contending Great War memories have helped to shape how later wars were imagined. The Vimy Trap provides a probe of commemoration cultures. This work of public history—combining scholarly insight with sharp-eyed journalism, and based on primary sources and school textbooks, battlefield visits and war art—explains both how and why peace and war remain contested terrain in ever-changing landscapes of Canadian memory.

    Kingston writer Jamie Swift is the author of numerous books and lectures at the Smith School of Business at Queen’s University. He is the co-author (with Ian McKay) of_ Warrior Nation: Rebranding Canada in the Age of Anxiety._

    We acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, which last year invested $153 million to bring the arts to Canadians throughout the country. Nous remercions le Conseil des arts du Canada de son soutien. L’an dernier, le Conseil a investi 153 millions de dollars pour mettre de l’art dans la vie des Canadiennes et des Canadiens de tout le pays.

  • Ian McKay on The Vimy Trap, Toronto

    Steelworkers Hall, 25 Cecil Street, Toronto, ON

    Part of the Toronto Worker’s History Project, join co-author Ian McKay for a talk on The Vimy Trap.

    The story of the bloody 1917 Battle of Vimy Ridge is, according to many of today’s tellings, a heroic founding moment for Canada. This noble, birth-of-a-nation narrative is regularly applied to the Great War in general. Yet this mythical tale is rather new. “Vimyism”—today’s official story of glorious, martial patriotism—contrasts sharply with the complex ways in which veterans, artists, clerics, and even politicians who had supported the war interpreted its meaning over the decades.

    Was the Great War a futile imperial debacle? A proud, nation-building milestone? Contending Great War memories have helped to shape how later wars were imagined. The Vimy Trap provides a probe of commemoration cultures. This work of public history—combining scholarly insight with sharp-eyed journalism, and based on primary sources and school textbooks, battlefield visits and war art—explains both how and why peace and war remain contested terrain in ever-changing landscapes of Canadian memory.

    Ian McKay is the L.R. Wilson Chair in Canadian History at McMaster University and the author of the award-winning_ Reasoning Otherwise: Leftists and the People’s Enlightenment in Canada, 1890–1920_ and the co-author of Warrior Nation: Rebranding Canada in the Age of Anxiety.

  • Joseph Tohill speaking on Shopping for Change

    Toronto Reference library, 789 Young Street, Toronto, ON

    Consuming with a conscience is one of the fastest growing forms of political participation worldwide. Every day we make decisions about how to spend our money and, for the socially conscious, these decisions matter. Political consumers “buy green” for the environment or they “buy pink” to combat breast cancer. They boycott Taco Bell to support migrant workers or Burger King to save the rainforest.

    But can we overcome the limitations of consumer identity, the conservative pull of consumer choice, co-optation by corporate marketers, and other pitfalls of consumer activism in order to marshal the possibilities of consumer power? Can we, quite literally, shop for change?

    Shopping for Change:Consumer Activism and the Possibilities of Purchasing Power brings together historical and contemporary perspectives of academics and activists to show readers what has been possible for consumer activists in the past and what might be possible for today’s consumer activists.

    Join co-editor Joseph Tohill for talk on Shopping for Change!

  • Kevin Mckay on “Radical Transformation” in Toronto

    Toronto Reference Library, Hinton Learning Theatre (3rd floor) 789 Yonge St, , Toronto, ON

    Radical Transformation:Oligarchy, Collapse, and the Crisis of Civilization is a story about industrial civilization’s impending collapse, and about the possibilities of averting this fate. Human communities first emerged as egalitarian, democratic groups that existed in symbiotic relationship with their environments. Increasing complexity led to the emergence of oligarchy, in which societies became captive to the logic of domination, exploitation, and ecological destruction. The challenge facing us today is to build a movement that will radically transform civilization and once more align our evolutionary trajectory in the direction of democracy, equality, and ecological sustainability.

    “Kevin MacKay has produced an eyes-wide-open account of our civilizational crisis with rare honesty and integrity. His Radical Transformation embodies a radicalism in the best sense of going to the root of the matter and its implications for our embattled species. He moves effortlessly from the local to the universal and back again to tease out our human foibles and possibilities. A cri de ceour for sense and sanity in the face of the bulldozers of mindless growth.” – Richard Swift, author of S.O.S.: Alternatives to Capitalism

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