Between the Lines

Between the Lines

Challenging the mainstream since 1977

Events

  • Ester Reiter speaking on A Future Without Hate or Need in Montreal

    University of Concordia 4040 St-Laurent #R01, Montreal, QC

    The Concordia University Institute for Canadian Jewish Studies and The Museum of Jewish Montreal present a celebration of the A Future Without Hate or Need: The Promise of the Jewish Left in Canada

    Driven from their homes in Russia, Poland, and Romania by pogroms and poverty, many Jews who came to Canada in the wave of immigration after the 1905 Russian revolution were committed radicals. A Future Without Hate or Need brings to life the rich and multi-layered lives of a dissident political community, their shared experiences and community-building cultural projects, as they attempted to weave together their ethnic particularity—their identity as Jews—with their internationalist class politics.

  • Ottawa and Empire: Toronto Book Launch

    Another Story Book Shop, 315 Roncesvalles Ave, Toronto, ON

    In June 2009, the democratically elected president of Honduras was kidnapped and whisked out of the country while the military and business elite consolidated a coup d’etat. To the surprise of many, Canada implicitly supported the coup and assisted the coup leaders in consolidating their control over the country.

    Since the coup, Canada has increased its presence in Honduras, even while the country has been plunged into a human rights catastrophe, highlighted by the assassination of prominent Indigenous activist Berta Cáceres in 2016. Drawing from the Honduran experience, Ottawa and Empire:Canada and the Military Coup in Honduras makes it clear that Canada has emerged as an imperial power in the 21st century.

    Tyler Shipley is professor of Culture, Society, and Commerce at the Humber Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning. He is an Associate Fellow with the Centre for Research on Latin America and the Caribbean (CERLAC). He has written for academic journals and local and mainstream media across North America and Europe.

  • Packingtown (Mayworks Festival of Working People and the Arts)

    Steelworkers Hall, 25 Cecil St, Toronto, ON

    Between the Lines is proud to co-present the Video Ballad Packingtown. Packingtown shares the vibrant people’s history of North Edmonton through original songs and video interviews with people who worked at the meatpacking plants and lived in the community during the height of the meatpacking industry there (early 1900s to 1980s). The 60-minute live music and video performance weaves music and lyrics written by Juno-nominated songwriter Maria Dunn, with video footage, historical photographs, and video interviews collected and edited by videographer Don Bouzek of Ground Zero Productions (GZP) and historian-curator Catherine C. Cole with the support of northeast resident Janice Melnychuk. The performance will feature Maria Dunn accompanied by Shannon Johnson and Jeremiah McDade of the Juno award winning Celtic-world fusion band, The McDades.

    The creation of Packingtown was funded by the Edmonton Heritage Council, Edmonton and District Labour Council, Alberta Historical Resources Foundation, the Alberta Federation of Labour and UFCW Local 1118.

    Co-presented with Briarpatch Magazine, George Brown College - School of Labour, Between the Lines

    Co-sponsored by UFCW

    For more information see The Mayworks Festival.Although all Mayworks 2017 events are FREE, Mayworks requests that you obtain a ticket to the event to guarantee a seat via Eventbrite

  • Jamie Swift on The Vimy Trap in Vancouver

    SFU-Vancouver (Harbour Centre) 515 West Hastings Street Room 7000 (Earl & Jennie Lohn Policy Room, 7th floor), Vancouver, BC

    Come out to hear Jamie Swift speak on The Vimy Trap:or, How We Learned To Stop Worrying and Love the Great War. The Vimy Trap has been shortlisted for the Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing and Sir John A. Macdonald Prize.

    The story of the bloody 1917 Battle of Vimy Ridge is, according to many of today’s tellings, a heroic founding moment for Canada. This noble, birth-of-a-nation narrative is regularly applied to the Great War in general. Yet this mythical tale is rather new. “Vimyism”— today’s official story of glorious, martial patriotism—contrasts sharply with the complex ways in which veterans, artists, clerics, and even politicians who had supported the war interpreted its meaning over the decades.

    Was the Great War a futile imperial debacle? A proud, nation-building milestone? Contending Great War memories have helped to shape how later wars were imagined. The Vimy Trap provides a powerful probe of commemoration cultures. This subtle, fast-paced work of public history—combining scholarly insight with sharp-eyed journalism, and based on primary sources and school textbooks, battlefield visits and war art—explains both how and why peace and war remain contested terrain in ever-changing landscapes of Canadian memory.

    Co-sponsored by the Department of Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies and the Department of History

  • Joseph Tohill speaking on Shopping for Change

    Toronto Reference library, 789 Young Street, Toronto, ON

    Consuming with a conscience is one of the fastest growing forms of political participation worldwide. Every day we make decisions about how to spend our money and, for the socially conscious, these decisions matter. Political consumers “buy green” for the environment or they “buy pink” to combat breast cancer. They boycott Taco Bell to support migrant workers or Burger King to save the rainforest.

    But can we overcome the limitations of consumer identity, the conservative pull of consumer choice, co-optation by corporate marketers, and other pitfalls of consumer activism in order to marshal the possibilities of consumer power? Can we, quite literally, shop for change?

    Shopping for Change:Consumer Activism and the Possibilities of Purchasing Power brings together historical and contemporary perspectives of academics and activists to show readers what has been possible for consumer activists in the past and what might be possible for today’s consumer activists.

    Join co-editor Joseph Tohill for talk on Shopping for Change!

  • Books, Beer, and Birthday Cake

    Glad Day Bookshop, 499 Church Street, Toronto, ON

    Books, Beer, and Birthday Cake: Three independent publishers. Three landmark anniversaries. One party!

    Join us as we collectively celebrate our authors and our publishing accomplishments at the oldest LGBTQ indie bookstore in the world (very near to the Ryerson campus). In 2017, University of Manitoba Press turns 50, Between the Lines turns 40, and Fernwood Publishing turns 25.

    Come out for an evening of revelry. We’ll have refreshments, door prizes (surprises), and more!

  • Ottawa and Empire Ottawa book launch

    Octopus Books, 116 Third Ave, Ottawa, ON

    In June 2009, the democratically elected president of Honduras was kidnapped and whisked out of the country while the military and business elite consolidated a coup d’etat. To the surprise of many, Canada implicitly supported the coup and assisted the coup leaders in consolidating their control over the country.

    Since the coup, Canada has increased its presence in Honduras, even while the country has been plunged into a human rights catastrophe, highlighted by the assassination of prominent Indigenous activist Berta Cáceres in 2016. Drawing from the Honduran experience, Ottawa and Empire:Canada and the Military Coup in Honduras makes it clear that Canada has emerged as an imperial power in the 21st century.

    Tyler Shipley is professor of Culture, Society, and Commerce at the Humber Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning. He is an Associate Fellow with the Centre for Research on Latin America and the Caribbean (CERLAC). He has written for academic journals and local and mainstream media across North America and Europe.

  • Ottawa and Empire Winnipeg book launch

    McNally Robinson Grant Park Shopping Centre, 1120 Grant Ave, travel alcove., Winnipeg, MB

    In June 2009, the democratically elected president of Honduras was kidnapped and whisked out of the country while the military and business elite consolidated a coup d’etat. To the surprise of many, Canada implicitly supported the coup and assisted the coup leaders in consolidating their control over the country.

    Since the coup, Canada has increased its presence in Honduras, even while the country has been plunged into a human rights catastrophe, highlighted by the assassination of prominent Indigenous activist Berta Cáceres in 2016. Drawing from the Honduran experience, Ottawa and Empire makes it clear that Canada has emerged as an imperial power in the 21st century.

    Tyler Shipley is professor of Culture, Society, and Commerce at the Humber Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning. He is an Associate Fellow with the Centre for Research on Latin America and the Caribbean (CERLAC).

  • Kevin Mckay on “Radical Transformation” in Toronto

    Toronto Reference Library, Hinton Learning Theatre (3rd floor) 789 Yonge St, , Toronto, ON

    Radical Transformation:Oligarchy, Collapse, and the Crisis of Civilization is a story about industrial civilization’s impending collapse, and about the possibilities of averting this fate. Human communities first emerged as egalitarian, democratic groups that existed in symbiotic relationship with their environments. Increasing complexity led to the emergence of oligarchy, in which societies became captive to the logic of domination, exploitation, and ecological destruction. The challenge facing us today is to build a movement that will radically transform civilization and once more align our evolutionary trajectory in the direction of democracy, equality, and ecological sustainability.

    “Kevin MacKay has produced an eyes-wide-open account of our civilizational crisis with rare honesty and integrity. His Radical Transformation embodies a radicalism in the best sense of going to the root of the matter and its implications for our embattled species. He moves effortlessly from the local to the universal and back again to tease out our human foibles and possibilities. A cri de ceour for sense and sanity in the face of the bulldozers of mindless growth.” – Richard Swift, author of S.O.S.: Alternatives to Capitalism

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